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Connecting free prenatal education materials the Dots
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Connecting free prenatal education materials the Dots
" I advocate because the USA has the highest maternal morbidity and mortality rates compared to similar countries. September 14, 2021 | by: Sharon Muza, BS, LCCE, FACCE, CD/BDT, CLE September 09, 2021 | by: Sharon Muza, BS, CD/BDT, LCCE, FACCE, CLE Here are some resources that educators and others can share with Hispanic families in their classes and access for themselves if they teach in Spanish. Lamaze International has many Spanish speaking educators and there are several Latino Lamaze programs that train educators in Spanish. In perinatal classes, it is important to provide information and present bodyfeeding as a normal event that occurs ideally within the first hour after birth and continues for as long as both parent and baby desire.  In reality, I often say that bodyfeeding is the next big challenge after birth.  We know that while “natural,” it is often something that a new baby and a new parent need to learn as a dyad and there can be challenges during the early days and weeks. Hispanics currently make up nearly 20 percent of the population in the United States and this number is projected to grow significantly in the next 20 years.  It is important to have perinatal resources and information available for the Hispanic families in your classes who would prefer to use Spanish language materials. Some of those challenges require the use of specialized equipment or tools, while other situations may arise where new parents find it helpful to have some things on hand to help things go more smoothly.  Many of these items are completely unfamiliar to parents especially those having their first baby.  Families appreciate the Lactation Station activity and leave with more familiarity about what items might be handy to have around when lactation is getting started or facing some hurdles September 07, 2021 | by: Catherine McWherter
August 26, 2021 | by: Sharon Muza, BS, LCCE, FACCE, CD/BDT, CLE I advocate because I want to be part of the change." September 15th through October 15th is National Hispanic Heritage Month in the United States.  The purpose of National Hispanic Heritage Month is to recognize the achievements and contributions of Hispanic Americans. Research and resources for perinatal professionals. Sharon Muza, BS, LCCE, FACCE, CD/BDT, CLE has been an active perinatal professional since 2004, teaching Lamaze classes to thousands of families and doula-ing through her private practice in Seattle, WA. Sharon is also a trainer of new birth doulas and childbirth educators. She blogs professionally on perinatal topics. Sharon enjoys facilitating discussion around best practice, current research and its practical application to maternal infant health and community standards. To learn more about Sharon, you are invited to visit her website, SharonMuza.com . I advocate because race, ethnicity, religion, age, gender identity, sexual orientation, or any other factor should not affect birth outcomes. " Do I advocate for others because in a moment of vulnerability I was able to ask for what I needed and advocate for myself and I feel compelled by unspoken rules of reciprocity to empower others who are on a similar journey? Do I advocate for improving health care and settings because I had a glimpse of what it was like to face language and cultural barriers to care and want to make sure others have a better experience? Or does my desire to advocate come from someplace darker, a misplaced sense of self-righteous moral obligation? So, is this experience really why I advocate? Maybe. I don’t know if anyone can ever point to a single reason for why we do what we do. free prenatal education materials Perhaps there isn’t an experience or an external reason at all." - Sarah Paksima September 16, 2021 | by: Sharon Muza, BS, LCCE, FACCE, CD/BDT, CLE September 02, 2021 | by: Sharon Muza, BS, LCCE, FACCE, CD/BDT, CLE Today, as part of the Series: Why I Advocate , I take the opportunity to share the top ten reasons that I advocate for families and help families to learn how to be strong self advocates for their own care.  This is a weekly series leading up to the  Lamaze International 2021 Virtual Advocacy Summit on September 27-29.  The virtual summit is an opportunity to connect with your fellow Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educators from around the world, who will be meeting to address the most critical and timely policy issues that affect prenatal care and childbirth outcomes. In this series, blog readers will have an opportunity to meet perinatal professionals and read their personal essays on why they advocate for evidence based care, improved policies and funding that impact birth outcomes.  You can find the entire " Why I Advocate" Series here . I advocate because evidence-based childbirth education should be accessible to everyone. Early next week is the Lamaze 2021 Advocacy Summit and the final details are all coming together so that registrants from around the world can learn and network in a virtual environment that helps families be able to receive evidence-based care, improving outcomes for parents and babies. I have been advocating and helping families to become better advocates for their own perinatal care for almost 20 years.  Here are my top ten reasons I believe this is important.  Maybe your reasons are similar to mine? On February 7, 1999, while almost six months pregnant, I lost my second child to a preterm birth.  That was one of the hardest things I ever had to endure. The months before were spent preparing for the birth, planning out how to parent two children and building my life with the love of my life were the highlights of my existence.  I would have never thought that all that planning would come crumbling down in an instant. August 23, 2021 | by: Brenda Kirkpatrick, AIMI, CD, LCCE, FACCE September 23, 2021 | by: Sharon Muza, BS, LCCE, FACCE, CD/BDT, CLE "I teach both in a hospital environment and directly to parents who are planning on giving birth in a variety of settings. In either case, I always ask, “ What is your fantasy birth?” In other words, if you knew that no matter what you and your baby would both be safe, what kind of birth story would you like to tell? It should be shocking to realize how low of a bar most people have set for their expectations." - Brenda Kirkpatrick September is Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Awareness Month.  Families do not plan or expect to end up in the NICU with their baby, but premature births, or medical conditions at birth, mean that a baby will need specialized care for a period of time that could be just a few hours after birth or extend many months, until a baby is healthy enough to go home.  Here are resources that you may want to share with families, in case they find themselves in the NICU. The American Academy of Pediatricians just a released an updated list of answers to Frequently Asked Questions on the topic of bodyfeeding. when can you start prenatal care